Art Tuning Shop

The public was invited to bring their old artworks in for a minor reworking or a major overhaul. The cost was dependent on the degree of alteration.

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The public was invited to bring their old artworks in for a minor reworking or a major overhaul. The cost was dependent on the degree of alteration.

Make art not waste

There’s no need to take an old car to the scrap yard; it can be overhauled or given a tune-up through “refined recycling”. Think US TV show Pimp My Ride. So why can’t we update art?

In the fall of 2007, a project called Janin Taidetuunaamo (Jani’s Art Tuning Shop) was launched. Three shipping containers were erected on the lawn of the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki. Two of the containers, one on top of the other, housed an exhibition of already tuned artworks; the third container was the actual tuning shop.

Jani’s Art Tuning Shop didn’t offer repair or restoration work on paintings. The idea was to improve existing paintings. The billions of euros worth of ugly art found in people’s closets was an excellent place to start. The purpose of Jani’s Art Tuning Shop was to increase the absolute value of this hidden art. Customers paid rates depending on the extent of the ‘repairs’.

See the art tuning price-list here.

The works were not only drift-market works but a Louise Bourgeois, a Picasso and a Dali were brought by collectors excited by the idea.